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Some Characteristics Of Carp Fishing Versus Bass Fishing!

Carp Fishing versus Bass Fishing

Magnificent Carp Fishing
Picture Credits to Rick Evans at http://www.rickevansphotography.com

There are some specific differences between Carp fishing versus Bass fishing. Ultimately an in an attempt at unbiased journalism, it is fair to say many fisherman discover a preference within themselves, based on a number of professional and personal standards. In the end however, the choice between fishing preferences illustrates a true fisherman’s passion for sentiment amongst the fishing craft.


Deciding a preference on Carp versus Bass fishing delegates an introspective glance into not just the sport of fishing but the type of person a fisherman is entirely. This is because the decision splits hairs over the differences between trophy fishing and fishing for a quality meal.

First and foremost, it is necessary for you to know the aging difference of both types of fish. In Carp fishing, the young Carp are less sensitive to the environmental conditions. They do not easily die in case there are somehow ultra extreme weather conditions that may occur in certain places. The young Carp can easily swim their way through the advanced stages of prolonged harsh environments but are not usually particularly well liked for a meal. On the other hand, Bass are slightly more sensitive to the cold, or frigid temperatures, when compared to Carp. When there are some changes in the environment, Bass fish experience stress making them more difficult to fish in more tumultuous areas.

Many fisherman also will come under the impression that because Carp survive in more areas and for longer periods ,(and in greater numbers) that Carp fishing is easier. Specifically, carp fishing can be easily attracted by enthusiasts who simply want a mantle piece for their home or office. Many fisherman also easily catch Carp, since during their seasonal reproduction Carp proliferate in a “bunched” matter, often splashing the surface of the water giving away their position.  There is no need to do a lot of trapping techniques in order to get the first and the succeeding catches you want, it’s even easier than that. On the other hand, bass fishing is a little more meticulous and challenging.

When it comes to size, Carp fishing takes the cake by a large margin, as a commonplace trophy fish. If you want to commercialize your feats on the water, than maybe Carp fishing is your thing. Moreover, you can also bring in huge numbers of Carp since they are so commonly reproducing alongside one another, as mentioned earlier. In the case of your bass fishing, you will found out that these fish come in smaller more elusive sizes, when compared to Carp. The size of Bass depends on the size of the body of water, where large mouth Bass weighing in at huge weights is more rare and displays more expertise of a true fishing enthusiast.

This is information you have to keep in mind in terms of Carp fishing versus Bass fishing, where to go and how to fish for these very different aquatic specimens. Carp tend to be bottom feeders, the choice for which is more delicious when prepared is easy, that is Bass. Bass are sportier, but Carp are the more demanding fish to catch, making them an ideal fishing target. Carp will fight the line for as long as a fisherman allows and make a great story to tell every catch. Fishing for Carp is argued by many as more exciting and provoking, nevertheless whichever your fish of choice, have fun fishing!

Monster Carp The Size Of A Whale

Monster Carp The Size Of A Whale


Everyone has that special fish. The story they tell at Thanksgiving dinner, “that one time,” that lives in family infamy. A proud man keeps an ornament, cleanly propped above the fireplace. More humble fisherman might never tell the story at all, smirking to god over their good fortune. Regardless of the path a fisherman chooses, catching the right Carp will quench the thirst of any outdoors adventurer (as long as they aren’t hungry).

Carp are some of the most magnificent species under the water, frequently willing to fight a lure right off the pole. The Carp pictured above, a whopping monster Carp, was brought down some years ago in frigid northern waters. Monster Carp like this survive all over the United States, as well as Canada. Adventurers looking to grab a similar monster Carp, often need not look further than their local stream. Carp grow “into” their environment, often allowing “monster carp,” like the one above, to grow throughout the entirety of their lifespan, find a deep stream and a monster Carp may live there.

Known predominantly as a bottom feeder, often mislabeled and frequently released, Carp fishing is about the adrenaline rush of bagging not just any fish, but thee “monster Carp.” Tales spawn from all over the world of particular individual monster Carp reaching 200-300-400 pounds. Even ancient artwork, from North American Indians long since evacuated, suggests monster Carp have been a favorite grab for sport fisherman, dating back centuries. It is human nature, a fisherman’s most natural and innate desire, to bag a BIG fish. Not just a Big fish, a monster, a giant, a Goliath, from here to here and over there. A “that one timer.” Monster Carp provide specifically that desire, an opportunity to quench that natural thirst for fishing sports greatest achievement. North American Carp like this are some of my favorite fish personally, so I am biased to the craft I must admit. I love to cast my line, medium action, and get to work.

Monster Carp fishing is awesome, ideally with a medium action line, designed to bend about 2/3’s down the rod and providing great safety. I give up some distance on my cast, sometimes I even RC Fish, I prefer streams, where I can see the monster. Reeling in a 100 pound fish provides that moment of satisfaction. Don’t hesitate, don’t worry about slender details, find a local stream and go to work!

Boilie tipped with sweetcorn carp fishing


Underwater video of carp and a tipped boilie. See more underwater carp video’s at my website www.underwatersecrets.co.uk Please add your comments, I love feedback and new ideas to video. The carp appears to pick out the tipped boilie time after time before being caught.


Making Carp Bait Part 2-How to make your own paste for coarse/carp fishing


How to make your own paste for course/carp fishing in just a few minutes. Extras can be added along the way for extra effect. So how do you choose which ingredients to use, which ratios of these to use and why? The first step is commonly practicality; can you put these things together into a dough or paste, to produce a boilie mix that will bind together and roll well? To produce a boilie from various ingredients without instructions on ratios of each ingredient takes some preliminary testing. So it is wise to start by using one large hen’s egg (or similar), mixed with a small amount of any liquid ingredients, to confirm that your test dry ingredients when mixed actually bind and roll well into balls to make boiled baits. If not, add more egg, a small amount of vegetable oil or ‘binding material’.

Ideally start by putting the carp’s dietary needs first when making bait, and begin with the bulk ‘whole protein food’ content of ingredients at 25 % to 50 % of your preliminary 100 % dry mixture. Such examples used could be combinations of some of the following: caseins, lactalbumin, fish meals, meat meals, whey protein.

Usually you will require a binding material to hold the protein food together in the bait. This may require using dry binding ingredients like semolina, wheat gluten, wheat flour, soya flour etc for up to 50 % of the mix, necessary for many types of coarse bird food meals, shellfish meals, meat and fish meals. Different bait materials will alter this approximate ratio, but use the ratio that rolls first! And increase the protein content from there (Using eggs / egg powder to bind your bait, adds a great nutritional added profile as a complete protein food.)

Examples of binders:

Hen’s eggs Egg powder Whey gel Bread crumbs Full fat ‘yellow’ semolina Maize meal Corn starch Potato starch White ground rice flour Wheat flour Wheat gluten Potato gluten Full fat soya flour Ground seeds Ground ‘Sluis CLO’ Ground ‘EMP’ Ground ‘CeDe’ Ground ‘Red band’ pigeon seed mix Beef gelatin based binding products.

Some of the most effective attraction of your bait comes from the water soluble fraction of particular ingredients used. Ingredients with this characteristic content could constitute 10 % up to 30 % of the mix. Making a resilient practical boilie mix may require the addition or reduction of only one ingredient. Some of the best baits you will ever discover are made by this trial and error process. The solubility of ingredients is especially recommended if an ingredient has high protein value, such as sodium and calcium caseinates, calf milk replacers, whole milk powder, yeast powder, hydrolyzed fish and shellfish proteins etc…

Some are used at much lower levels, e.g. 0.2 % to 6 % ; e.g., hydrolyzed fish protein, hydrolyzed spirulina extract, squid extract, anchovy extract, green crab / lobster / scallop / shrimp / oyster / baby clam extracts, green lip mussel extract etc. These are also effective as most are extremely quickly and efficiently digested with immediate benefits that the carp can feel.

I prefer to fresh freeze baits, or ‘air dry’ them naturally, or preserve them in a flavor / amino acid / supplement compound, rather than using a chemical preservative in the bait like ascorbic acid.

Carp require oils (essential fatty acids) but only in small amounts e.g., up to 5 % of your total dry mix. Oily fish meals and shellfish meals are already rich in these, as are flax seed, hemp seed, sesame seeds, salmon oil, cod liver oil, crustacean oil, etc. To meet minimum carp dietary requirements try adding perhaps around 1 milliliter to 3 milliliters of a good quality nutritional oil per egg, (maximum,) depending on oil level in the dry mix.

At times of year when water temperatures drop below 55 Fahrenheit / 13 Degrees Celsius, it’s sensible to drop the oil levels used or use emulsified oil. It also pays to reduce some of your ‘whole protein food’ content and substitute it with e.g., 3 ounces of wheat germ; this is a proven method of improving the biological conversion of your bait inside the carp by making your bait more ‘carp digestible’

Carp love to crunch food and in doing so send out all kinds of feeding signals to other carp, allowing attractive food particles to pass out of the gills.

Nutritional ingredients can be used for this effect, e.g. bird foods – ‘Robin Red’, ‘Red Factor’,‘Nectarblend’, Ground ‘Red Band’ pigeon food, prepared ground mixed nuts and seeds; prepared tiger nuts and hempseed, millet, egg – biscuit myna – bird rearing food, niger seeds, ‘RRR’, ground birdseeds ‘Ce De’, ‘PTX’, ground insects, dried larvae, coarse kelp meal etc.

Also used are crushed oyster shell and eggshell. These also allow bait to release attractors faster, putting more out to attract carp quicker and more effectively, especially in lower water temperatures. They also help the fish to eat more bait by helping them pass it through their systems faster.

Test each individually because their properties vary. Use, e.g., 0.5 ounces per pound for shell through to e.g., 2 ounces per pound of course kelp meal, to e.g., 3 ounces per pound of ‘Robin Red’, ground birdseed e.g., 6 ounces per pound, up to 8 ounces per pound of ‘Nectar Blend’.

Here are some examples of recognized ‘nutritional’ bird food ingredients:

‘PTX’ ‘Robin Red’ ‘Red Factor’ ‘Nectar Blend’ ‘RRR’ Spanish peppers ‘Prosecto Insectivorous’ ‘Sluis’ CLO ‘Sluis’Universal ‘Sluis’ Mynhah bird food ‘CeDe’ ‘EMP’ ‘Red Venom’ carophyll red liquid pigment attractor (www.ccmoore.com)

Other ingredients are used to change resilience, texture, attractor leak-off, e.g., milk powders, whole milk, ‘Vitamealo’ at, e.g., 4 ounces per pound), or in a very soluble bait to bind it ‘tighter’ e.g., whey gel at 3 ounces per pound, or make it harder, e.g. blood powder at e.g. 4 ounces per pound, egg albumin at e.g., 2 ounces per pound, whole egg powder at, e.g., 3 ounces per pound, or whey gel, e.g., 1 ounce per pound.

To avoid silt / to make baits more buoyant, include ingredients like sodium caseinate, e.g. 5 ounces per pound, or shrimp meal, e.g. 3 ounces per pound or krill meal at e.g., 3 ounces per pound.

Vitamins and minerals are great attractors too, being essential for carp health and growth. Many of the above extracts supply these, but they leach out of bait very fast. Adding black strap molasses, betaine hydrochloride to the mix and as liquid soak really help.

Other ingredients can be added in very low levels to enhance your bait, or give it an ‘extra special attractive note’ e.g., 1 teaspoon per pound, of powdered taste enhancer, sea salt, or sweeteners like sodium saccharin and fishing company proprietary brands liquid and powdered sweeteners with no ‘chemical back taste’.

When you mix new ingredients together always test your mixture first. Try using one egg as a binder, to see if you have your ratios right for practical binding and rolling purposes. Always prepare your wet ingredients first and add dry ingredients to the wet ones gradually as you become accustomed to the ingredients you’re using, this part will become simple!

You can refine your bait’s nutritional content as you become familiar with getting practical bait together that works and catches carp. You will soon find it’s very easy to make all kinds of baits, and your secret bait armory will fill you with confidence and your photograph albums with big carp!

Are you good enough for a Carp Tournament?

Carp Fishing Tournament

1st Place $30,000 • 2nd Place $25,000 • 3rd Place $20,000 • 4th Place $15,000 • 5th Place $10,000



The most elite professional carp anglers in the world will compete in the Carp Angling World Championship (CAWC) on the St. Lawrence River the week of September 23, 2011. CARP Tournament Series and the St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce announced the St. Lawrence River in northern New York State will be the site for the world-class tournament. Over 100 two-person teams are expected to compete along a 30-plus mile course on the river corridor of St. Lawrence County.
Expected among the nations represented for the 100+ continuous hours of competition will be teams from the United States, England, France, Holland, Germany, Russia, Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Canada, South Africa, Romania, Japan, Ukraine and Bosnia.
The 2011 CAWC is sanctioned by the UK-based International Carp Fishing Association (ICFA).
Ray Scott, founder of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society® (BASS), will be the special celebrity guest at CARP Tournament Series’ elite Carp Angling World Championship on the St. Lawrence River in September. The legendary Scott sweetened the prize pool for the first-place winners with a getaway at his renowned private lake in Alabama.